NPR Morning Edition: Fight over flame retardants in furniture heats up

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From NPR Morning Edition

If you pick up a cushion from any sofa or piece of furniture that has foam, you’re likely to find a small white tag that reads: “This article meets all flammability requirements of California Bureau of Home Furnishings technical bulletin 117.”

The law, referred to as TB 117, was passed in California in 1975. It says that the foam inside upholstered furniture must be able to resist a flame, such as from a cigarette lighter or a candle. Rather than make different furniture just for California, big furniture makers adhere to those standards in all 50 states and even Canada.

Some scientists and lawmakers are now starting to think this policy, designed to make us safer, might actually have the opposite effect…

Amy Standen