Contaminated Groundwater, a Toxic Legacy of Georgia’s Air Bases

January 3, 2019

For decades, the United States Air Force used a toxic firefighting foam that contaminated water near bases and exposed communities to chemicals linked to cancer and a variety of other health problems.
Commercial airports are currently required to follow standards outlined in military specifications, which call for fluorinated foams to be used.

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Congress opens the door for fluorine-free firefighting foams

On October 5, federal legislation was enacted which will allow commercial airports in the U.S. to use firefighting foams without PFAS.  Until now, FAA rules have required airports to use firefighting foams that meet the U.S. military’s specification, which requires the use of PFAS.  Firefighting foam is a major source of PFAS contamination, so this should mean healthier drinking water for those living near airports.…

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Your questions about PFAS, answered.

October 2, 2018

There are more than 4,000 different chemicals in this family, including two common ones called “PFOA” and “PFOS.” PFAS chemicals are known for their durability – they are incredibly resistant to most elements, which is why they’ve been used in materials ranging from waterproof shoes to firefighting foam to non-stick pots and pans since the 1950s.…

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Deal would allow airports to stop using PFAS-containing foams

October 2, 2018

A provision in legislation to reauthorize the Federal Aviation Administration allow airports to use firefighting foams that don’t contain fluorinated chemicals.

Commercial airports are currently required to follow standards outlined in military specifications, which call for fluorinated foams to be used.

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‘What did we do?’ Families anxious about chemicals found in tap water

August 16, 2018

It’s been about three weeks since Tammy Cooper last drank water from her tap. That’s when she saw a warning on Facebook for residents of her small Western Michigan town to stop drinking the water.

In Michigan, water main breaks aren’t unusual, although they’re more common in winter. It didn’t immediately strike Cooper as out of the ordinary to not be able to drink the water.…

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